Sep 11-22 (4 articles to read)


First priority is relief for beleaguered residents Mike Yardley 05:00, Sep 11 2018

East's dramatic press conference last week has served its purpose. It has forced the council's hand to front up to the botch-up over the "omitted policy" and commit to fixing it. Without wishing to fry your head with technical planning parlance, the "policy" gives life to the "rule".

Victory for residents as council promises inquiry into coastal consents fiasco Dominic Harris, 22:09, Sep 12 2018

Christchurch mayor Lianne Dalziel has vowed to hold an independent inquiry into why a vital clause that would have made it easier to build houses in coastal communities was missed out of the city's district plan.

Dalziel promised to "pull out the stops" to ensure the legislation is fixed and said the city council would take urgent action to get to the bottom of why it was overlooked in the first place.

Council working to end District Plan confusion

21 Sep 2018 Options for removing the confusion in the District Plan about what building activity can occur in flood-prone coastal areas will be considered by Christchurch City Council next week.

What’s the issue with the District Plan?

How did the confusion arise?

Who was responsible for writing the Independent Hearing Panel’s decision?

How many properties are affected?

Has the confusion prevented people from building?

How do I know if a property is within one of these areas?

read the report

'Fix it honestly, fix it fast' - campaigners ask PM to help solve coastal consents row Dominic Harris, 05:00, Sep 22 2018

Campaigners fighting for a solution to the resource consents crisis in coastal Christchurch have issued a stern challenge to the prime minister, MP's and the city's leaders – "fix it properly, fix it honestly, fix it fast".

Three lines left out of Christchurch's district plan has left a community in despair

Dominic Harris 05:00, Sep 22 2018

The clause is indeed the root of the problem – 24 words that were left out of Christchurch's new district plan when it came into effect in December.

Buried in a chapter on natural hazards was meant to be a key instruction: In high flood hazard management areas, "provide for development for a residential unit on residentially zoned land where appropriate mitigation can be provided that protects people's safety, wellbeing and property".

Those three lines had a simple purpose – to give leeway to people in specific coastal areas previously deemed at risk of flooding from river surges, so they could build or extend homes.

Featured Posts
Recent Posts
Archive
Search By Tags

© 2021 CCRU Incorporated    

  • Facebook Social Icon
 Get access to our growing information base. Join CCRU today.
Join CCRU to help coastal residents be heard and receive fair treatment in
coastal hazard planning processes.
By joining CCRU you can choose to volunteer some time, make a donation, or simply be kept up to date on future issues, events and seminars. It's FREE.